Raiding

Raid times are Tues and Thursdays at 8:00pm and 11pm central time zone. Contact themeatwall for invites. Though it is impossible to go into every detail of raiding, this guide was created to be helpful to raiders and to answer some question that raiders may have.

Contents
A. Raiding Overview
   1. Read About Your Class  
   2. Get Your Mods
   3. Get Ventrilo
   4. Go to WoW-Heroes
B. DKP Overview
   1. Introduction to DKP 
   2. Inflation 
   3. Null-Value System 
   4. IDKP

 

A. Raiding Overview

1. Read About Your Class

Now more than ever, you need to know how to play your class better than ever! You will be running instances in the near future where other players depend on your knowledge of your class. A great place to read about your class is elitistjerks.com. There are many other great sites out there, collect as much info about your class as you can.

 

2. Get Your Mods

Mods are a great way to help your gaming experience and a good way to figure out what to do. Some of the most popular mods are as follows:

Deadly Boss Mods (DBM)
Probably the most important mod to have. This mod is a must have for raids and is also very useful in instances.

Atlas Loot
A very useful mod that helps you figure out what gear drops in which instances and what items become availible from different factions.

Omen
A mod that helps you manage your threat (aggro) in instances.

Recount
A mod that tracks stats in instances (dps / damage done / healing, e.t.c.).

Heal Bot
A mod that is useful if you are a healer as it lets you heal by clicking on its raid frame.

 

3. Get Ventrilo

If you plan on having a raiding career, ventrilo is a must-have. Many raids will expect you to have it and it's a great way to communicate.

 

4. Go to WoW-Heroes

One of the best sites to figure out what gear you have on and what it is worth is www.wow-heroes.com. Wow-heroes also will let you know what enchants to get for your character as well as what your gear score is in comparison to the rest of the guild.

 

B. DKP Overview

Salvation uses a zero-sum dkp system with idkp awarded on progressive runs. Careful thought was given to select what we felt was the best dkp system to suit our needs amoung the countless different types of dkp systems availiable. Some background information of these the type of system we use can be found in the following extracts taken from wowwiki:

 

1. An introduction to the DKP system

A few years back when the concept of raiding was introduced in MMO games, players invented a system to determine who would receive the rewards from the raids. This original system was called Dragon kill points, based on the two dragon bosses in the original Everquest, "Lord Nagafen" and "Lady Vox". The idea behind this concept was that the members of the guild who attended the raid were to be rewarded points for attending the dragon raids in order to determine who was the most eligible for the loot the dragons dropped. Prior to this, most guilds went with the random number generator and assigned the loot to whomever came out most lucky with the /random roll.

 

2. Inflation

In its early stages, most DKP systems which were used were designed around the idea that attending X raid would yield Y amount of points to each member. The members of the raid with the most points would then be the ones who were to receive the rewards from the raid. However, a while after such systems were implemented a severe flaw was detected – inflation. As most economists would testify to, the effects of inflation are hardly ever beneficial to an accounting system – which is what DKP in its base really is. The problem arose after members had been raiding for a while, and the amount of points coming into the system as a whole was much greater, or lower, than the amount of points being spent on the loots. The problem with this is that if you have more points coming into the system than are going out, the relative value of each raid would be diminished on a scale equal to the level of inflation in the system. Plainly put, there would be little to no fluctuation in the relative order of who are to receive loots. Allow me to give an example:

40 people attend a raid on "The woeful Forger", and as a result are each awarded 3 DKP. "The woeful Forger" drops 2 loots. The price for these loots is set to 10 points each. Now, at this point, a total of 120 points (40*3) has come into the system, but only 20 points (10*2) has gone out. Following this system, the amount of points coming into the system is 6 times greater than the amount of points being spent. 20 weeks later, all 40 members had received the items from The woeful Forger and there was no one left to loot the items, in which case, they were looted and sold for money that was put into the guild’s bank. What happens then is, not only are members earning points for attending raids, but nobody is spending any points at all. Everyone has the same amount of points, and as the weeks pass they all gain an equal amount. Eventually everyone has 300 points each, and everyone is on exactly the same standing. The value of all the members’ points is at this point nothing. They could all just as well have 0 points each rather than 300 each.

If a new member were to join the guild at this point, that member would never be able to catch up to any of the veteran members, and always have to pick up the scraps after every single one of the older members has had their pick – forever. This is a bad thing for any guild for a multitude of reasons. First of all, it is in the guild’s best interest that each of its members can perform at peak level. Secondly, the morale of any new member would be tremendously low as they would feel that all the effort they are putting into raiding with the guild is being wasted since they always are at the back of the line. Sooner or later, they would quit playing and the level of attrition of members would set in. Attrition like this is in many cases a domino effect, which in return would leave the guild unable to raid and eventually dissolve. A solution was required.

 

3. Null-value System

The solution to this problem was normalizing the amount of points in the system. This was done by changing the way members were rewarded for attending raids. Instead of raid X being worth a fixed sum of points regardless of which items dropped and were looted, the value of attending raids was made to reflect the value of the items looted on said raid. Simply put, this means that the sum of DKP coming into the system is always equal to the sum of DKP being spent and the system remains in balance. This is done by summing up the amount of points spent on items, and dividing the total points spent by the amount of members attending the raid. Example: 35 members attend a raid on "The woeful Forger" and he drops two items. One is worth 10 points, and one is worth 15 points. Both items are looted, resulting in the raid's worth being (15+10)/35 = 0.71 DKP. Everyone in the raid gained 0.71DKP, and the members who received the items are subtracted 15 points and 10 points respectively. A month down the line, the same encounter is raided by the same 35 people and the same two loots drop, however this time only the item worth 15 DKP is looted by a member, while the other one is destroyed/sold due to it not being of any upgrade to anyone attending the raid. The value of the raid is now 15 points / 35 members = 0.428 ~ 0.43. The points rewarded are of different amount than the first time due to less points being spent on the raid.

 

4. IDKP

When progressing through raid content as a guild there is often a lot of learning and failed attempts encounters. Due to the lack of items being looted on failed attempts, there can not be awarded any DKP to members due to that doing so would create inflation – e.g. DKP in = DKP out. In order to be able to reward the members for nights of learning and failed attempts on encounters, IDKP was developed. IDKP means Imaginary Raid Participation Points. The way IDKP works is any IDKP that comes into the system must always also go out, in true null value tradition. However when no items are being looted, how is this done? It’s simple. IDKP is used to award members attending failed raids or raids that do not produce DKP. Let us assume that guild X has 55 active members on the roster. The chance of everyone in the guild being online for every raid always is non existent. If the hard cap on how many members that can attend a raid is 40, having about 50-60 members is reasonable in order to always field a full 40 man raid.

So let us assume that 40 members show up for Raid Y, which consists of a night of failing the encounter and progressing through its learning curve. The guild leadership decides they want to award those members for attending although no items have dropped. They decide that the whole night worth of raiding should be worth 20 IDKP, which means 40 members each gain 20IDKP. At this point, there is a sum of +800 IDKP inflation in the system. After adding the IDKP to each member who attended the raid, the sum of 800 IDKP is then divided by the total amount of members in the system, in this case 55 total which equals 15.545 ~ 15.54. The sum of 15.54 IDKP is then deducted from everyone in the DKP system, not only the people who attended the raid. When all is settled and the adjustments have been made, the total sum of DKP + IDKP in the system is still zero, however, the people who attended the raid have a slightly higher total lotto DKP (Lotto DKP = Earned DKP + IDKP) and the members who did not attend the raid have a slightly lower lotto DKP than before. When thinking about IDKP, it is imperative that one does not think of IDKP in terms of gains and loss. IDKP is simply an adjustment which is applied to all members across the board. No one person will ever take a higher negative IDKP adjustment than anyone else in the guild. While it is true that members who do not attend said raid end up with a lower lotto DKP, the relative order of all members in the DKP system is intact. The net result is the exact same as if real DKP were rewarded, though without the heavy inflation .